Thursday, December 24, 2015

Phoebe (Holcomb) Owens, Daughter of Nathaniel Holcomb

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Phoebe Ann Hannah Holcomb, daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah Holcomb, was born about 1845 in Missouri. She came with her parents to California in 1849. She married James Anderson Owens on 26 June 1865 in Calaveras County, California. James A. Owens died in 1901 in Daggett, California, but was buried in the IOOF Cemetery in Hollister, San Benito County, California. Phoebe died 11 August 1923 San Francisco, California.

Phebe An Hannah Holcomb married James Anderson Owens on 26 June 1865 in Calaveras County, California
[Source: "California, County  Marriages, 1850-1952," database with images, FamilySearch]

25 July 1870, San Juan Twp., Monterey Co., CA, p. 399:

265 - 252
Holcomb, James A. 41 M W Deputy Co. Assessor MO
[Phoebe (Holcomb) Owen's brother is a bachelor, living three households away from her.]

268 - 256
Owens, James A. 35 M W Merchant  1,000 - 4,000 b. VA
--- Phoebe 25 F  W Keeps house b. MO
---Cyrus M W b. CA
---Florence 11/12 F W b. CA
Holcomb, Sarah 62 F  W Keeps house b. MO

23 June 1880, Hollister Twp., San Benito County, CA:

360-364
Owens, Phoebe W F 30 Keeping House b. MO fb. MO mb. MO
-----Cyrus W M 16 Son Student b. CA fb. VA mb. MO
-----Marens W M 8 Son Student b. CA fb. VA mb. MO
-----Emma W F 4 Dau b. CA fb. VA mb. MO
Holcomb, Sarah W F 72 Mother b. MO fb.  NY mb. MO

Phoebe Owen's uncle James Brown died at her home one 4 July 1887, Hollister, San Benito Co., CA:

Died - BROWN - In Hollister, July 4, 1887, at the residence of Mrs. J.A. Owens, James Brown, aged 62 years.
[Source: The Hollister Free Lance, 8 July 1887, San Benito Co., CA.]

4 June 1900, San Francisco, San Francisco Co, CA:

59-65
Robertson, Walter Head W M b. Feb 1871 29 M-5 b. CA fb. IL mb. MO
-----, Emma Wife W F b. Apr 1876 24 M-5 1-1 b. CA fb. VA mb. MO
-----, Hazel Dau W F b. Apr 1897 3  b. CA fb. CA mb. CA
Owens, Phoebe m-i-l, W F b. Sept 1845 54 M-5 1-1 b. MO fb. MO mb. MO
-----, b-i-l W M b. Oct 1866 33 S b. CA fb. MO mb. MO
-----, Clara s-i-l W F b. sept 1881 18 S b. CA fb. Mo mb. MO
Holcomb, Sarah Grandmother W F b. Sept 1808 91 Wd 6-2 b. MO fb. MO mb. MO

Phoebe (Holcomb) Owens was named in the death notice of her mother, Sarah Holcomb:

Died -- HOLCOMB -- at San Francisco, Nov. 14, Mrs. Sarah HOLCOMB, mother of Isaac W. HOLCOMB and Mrs. J.A. OWENS, formerly of this place, native of Missouri, aged 92 years.
Source: The Free Lance; Hollister, CA, 16 Nov 1900]

This obituary links Phoebe Ann Hannah (Holcomb) Owens and her brother Isaac Webster Holcomb to their mother Sarah Holcomb, widow of Nathaniel Holcomb.

Phoebe (Holcomb) Owen's husband died in the following year. This obituary appeared in The Free Lance, Hollister, California:

"OWENS--At Daggett, Cal., Aug. 1, James A. OWENS, beloved husband of Phoebe OWENS and father of Cyrus and Marcus OWENS, Mrs. W.L. ROBERTSON and Mrs. C.C. LONG, a native of Virginia, aged 71 years. […deceased was well known, being the first merchant in Hollister and the first postmaster appointed at this place. He came to California in 1852, and settled in Gilroy…afterwards emigrating to Alpine county and engaging in mining. Leaving Alpine county he came to Hollister, but went to Bodie during the great mining excitement, years ago. He remained at Bodie for about 5 years and then went to Daggett, where he resided for the past 15 years. During most of that period he was Justice of the Peace at that place…The cause of his death was heart failure, caused by heat prostration. He leaves a widow and 2 sons and 2 daughters, Cyrus W. and Marcus D. OWENS, Mrs. W.L. ROBERTSON and Mrs. C.C. LONG, all of San Francisco. Deceased was an excellent citizen…His death leaves but 1 charter member of Mound Lodge IOOF living, Mr. N.C. BRIGGS. The remains were brought here from Daggett and interred last Monday afternoon in the IOOF cemetery…]."
[Source: The Free Lance; Hollister, San Benito County; 9 Aug 1901.]

15 April 1910, Part of 32nd Assembly Dist., Pct 17, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA:

1225 San Bruno Ave
2-4
Robertson, Walter L. Head M W 39 M-1 14 b. CA fb. MO mb. MO
-----, Emma D. Wife F W 34 M-1 14 1-1 b. CA fb. VA mb. MO
-----, Hazel V Dau F W 13 S b. CA fb. CA mb. CA
Owens, Phebe A m-i-l F W 64 W 5-4 b. Mo fb. MO mb. MO
-----, Cyrus W b-i-l M W 43 S b. CA fb. VA mb. MO
Morrison,    M lodger M W 18 S b. CA fb. ? mb. unk

3&5 Jan 1920, 22 Dist., San Francisco, San Francisco Co., CA:

1225 San Bruno Ave
57-58
Owens, Pheobe A head F W 73 W b. MO fb. MO mb. MO
-----Cyrus W. son M W 52 S b. CA fb. MO mb. MO
      -59
Long Clara head F W 35 D b. CA fb. Mo mb. MO
-----, Claude C son M W 11 S b. CA fb. CA mb. CA

Obituary for Phoebe A. (Holcomb) Owens:

Mrs. Phoebe A. Owens, 76, crossed the plains with her parents in 1849 and resided for some time in Calaveras and San Benito Counties, previous to going to San Francisco, where she died; four children survive.
[Source: "Passing of the California Pioneer," Grizzly Bear, Sept 1923]




Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Isaac Webster Holcomb, son of Nathaniel Holcomb

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Isaac Webster Holcomb was a son of Nathaniel and Sarah Holcomb. Isaac was born in Galena, Illinois on 19 Sept 1829 and died on 19 Feb 1901 in Lassen County, California. He traveled west to California from Illinois in 1849 with the Rice-Imus wagon train. Upon reaching California, he married Emily Imus, daughter of Hiram Imus on 25 Sept 1851 in Santa Cruz, California.

The following account of the their wagon to trip to California is a ripping good yarn, but is unreliable since it cobbles together the accounts of other wagon trains, including the Donner party, which traveled west in the winter of 1846-47.

"Across the Plains, the True Story of a Caravan of 49ers" Los Angeles Times 6 Sept. 1908. Apparently an interview with Helen Rice McLaughlin (1840-1909).

"ACROSS THE PLAINS, the true story of a Caravan of 'forty-niners.' The Imus family leaves Illinois May 3, 1849. It was springtime of that momentous year 1849. Even in Illinois the birds were singing. The green blades of grass peeping through, the delicate little blossoms opening their dainty petals. Everything breathed of life, of hope, and pulses thrilled at the magic word 'California.' The call of the west was in men's blood. Beyond the Rockies lay the land of gold, the land of sunshine. Why toil for bread and shovel snow when once over the Great Divide, it was possible to shovel shining nuggets?

At Galena, Illinois on the morning of May 3, 1849, a party with their faces set westward were bidding farewell to friends and neighbors. Strong wagons drawn by the best horses and mules procurable were packed with household treasures and provisions. As staunch prairie schooners as ever floated on wheels waited for the tearful women and excited children to clamber to their seats, the men with shouts and jokes pretended to think only of what lay before; for once the teams were started, there must be no turning back. In the party were Philip Rice, his wife and 6 children; Hiram Imus [Sr.] and wife, parents of Mrs Rice; and Hiram Imus, Jr., and his wife and 11 children. All the spring months and up to early summer they journeyed on, driving their extra horses and cattle. The stock fattened on the luscious prairie grass. The women and children grew accustomed to the new mode of life and health came to even the weak ones of the party. They came up to and passed other parties bound for California and many trains of Mormons bound for the promised land of Utah. At the Platte River their first misfortune overtook them. Here they had settled their cattle, picketed and hobbled their horses and made camp for the night. Early next morning campfires were lighted, coffee pots were bubbling and bacon sizzling. Suddenly a herd of buffalo came tearing along and charged straight into the cattle, traveling north and crossing the river. They started in at daylight crossing at a lope and taking the cattle with them. This continued until 10:00 o'clock. They party rounded up the horses giving up the cattle as lost. A few of the men undertook to find them and at length discovered them with a Mormon train, declaring they had found them a hundred miles from the scene of the stampede. Before reaching Salt Lake City, they overtook the Donner party. The two parties traveled on to Salt Lake City, planning to rest there and lay in provisions for the last and hardest part of the journey. Many scouting bands of Indians had been encountered on the way but no serious trouble had come from them. Now, however, they were out in larger forces threatening and destroying. A number of small trains had returned to Salt Lake City because of the Indians. The Mormons were not prepared to accommodate so many transient people, so they were advised to move on. A great train consisting of the families that left Galena, the Donner [!?] party, and several smaller parties numbering fifty families left Salt Lake City early in December, Captain Fly being selected as commander.

Now the year was waning with short days and cold nights. No longer the swelling Platte, the silver Nebraska or any other refreshing stream quenched the thirst of man or beast. The sand and sage brush, the scantily filled water holes of acrid water replaced them. Often after goading the worn out animals to the limit of their endurance, a dry camp had to be made. For weeks the train had passed piles of furniture, bedding and even good wagons that had been left behind to lighten the burdens of the used up horses and scrawny oxen. Often a paper was found pinned to a pile of goods bearing the legend 'Take any of these things you want, they are clean but our beasts are given out.' Skeletons of horses and oxen strewed the trail and often a little pile of stones or crude cross marked the grave of one who had fallen by the way. As winter came on, hardships were greater. The train, now greatly lessened, for many died before the Sierras were sighted, divided. The three families that left Galena decided to try to get into California by turning south, passing down Nevada and coming into Los Angeles. The rest formed a train that took the Donner Lake route. The Rice and Imus families were now in a sad plight. The stock had all been abandoned save the horses and mules, and a few forlorn oxen that were, one by one, killed off to save the lives of the starving people. By the time they had abandoned everything but the necessities of life, the stock was so thin and jaded that travel was about to a standstill. First the salt gave out, then food became so scarce that they had to put what was left under lock and key and the key delivered to Mr. Rice. Everyone was allowed just so much. Regular rations were served, one slice of bread while the flour lasted. The oxen, when killed, had little to offer besides bone and hide. The bones were boiled and a broth made. The hide was scraped, cut into strips and dried, and a bit of rawhide was given out to chew on when the stomach could no longer be denied. At last they were forced to eat one of the mules. They even boiled the hide for soup. The scarcity of the food supply was getting serious and the train was slowed down almost to a halt. At last the end seemed to have come. The jaded mules could not be goaded another mile. For weeks there had been no bread, nothing but coffee and rawhide. Death seemed a welcome release from such horrors.

One young couple, whose names little Helen Rice, now a white- lady, Mrs McLaughlin living at El Pismo, has forgotten, started out on foot, saying if they failed to reach help they could only die, anyway. Ike Holcomb and 'Kentuck' Phillips volunteered to try to reach a settlement and started. A few miles from where they had left the others, they passed the young man and his wife, and no human eye ever again beheld them, so far as known. What their fate was, or where it met them, can only be conjectured.

After traveling day and night, Phillips and Holcomb sighted a ranch owned by a man named Rollins. They told their story and begged for supplies to carry back to their comrades. Rollins at first refused to send aid, saying he had already been duped by several parties who told similar tales. Phillips offered either himself, or Holcomb, as hostage, saying Rollins could put irons upon the one left, and if within a reasonable time he who went failed to return, or send proof of his story, they one left could be hanged or shot. Rollins being convinced or partly so, Holcomb was put under guard, and Williams, a man who supplied flour to the ranch, gave flour, Rollins other supplies, and 'Kentuck', without one hour's rest, loaded his goods on an old Spanish oxcart, and started back. He was told it was 150 miles to where he had left his party. Day and night he traveled, never leaving the cart, reaching the desolate camp at midnight. The children were sleeping, but around a little fire, sat the men and women. At his call the men sprang to their feet, but the women fell to their knees, and the tears so long withheld, now streamed over their haggard faces.

Mrs. Imus mixed some flour, water and salt together, and some small 'pancakes' were quickly baked in the frying pan. The children were awakened from their sleep and sitting about on wagon tongues, on rocks, and on the ground, each one received a tiny cake, but after the long fast, danger must be averted, so to the piteous begging for 'just one more, Aunt,' the woman shook her head and hid her face in her apron, and cried. In a few days the party started for Rollins' Ranch, and on reaching it were made welcome, and given food and shelter both for themselves and worn out animals. Mr. Rice was anxious to get to his brother-in-law, Capt Charles Imus of the Mexican War, who lived at Santa Cruz, so started out and left Los Angeles May 3, 1850 just a year from the day he had so hopefully set out for the golden west. Charles Imus was a Captain under General Fremont. He and Rollins had served together in war and both were together in the same war prison, so his relatives were well outfitted when they left the Rollins ranch for Santa Cruz. In time the remnants of the Rice and Imus party reached Santa Cruz and their descendants became well known citizens."
[Source: Los Angeles Times. September 6, 1908].

Marriage record of Isaac Holcomb:

Isaac Halcomb married Emily Imus on 25 Sep 1851 in Santa Cruz Co., California.
[Source: "California, County Marriages, 1850-1952," database with images, FamilySearch.org]

7 July 1860, Soquel Twp., Santa Cruz Co., CA, P.O. Soquel:

575-463
Isaac Holcomb 30 M Stable Keeper $500-$2,500 b. Michigan
Emily ----- 29 f b. Michigan
Stephen ----- 8 M b. CA
Hiram ----- 6 M b. CA
Walter ----- 5 M b. CA
Charles ----- 3 M b. CA
Cyrus Duncan 35 M Common laborer b. KY
James Hoffman 33 M Common laborer b. MO

12 Aug 1870, Soquel Twp, Santa Cruz Co., CA, p. 443:

Holcomb, Isaac 42 M W Farming 0 - 300 b. MO
---Emily 40 F  W Keeps house  b. IL
---Stephen N. 18 M W Works on farm b. CA
---James H. 16 M W " b. CA
---Walter H. 14 M W b. CA
---Charles A. 11 M W b. CA
---Eliza 9 F  W  b. CA
---Etta 7 F  W b. CA
---Alfred 4 M W b. CA
---Edwin /12 M W b. CA

1876 Voter Registration, Soquel, Santa Cruz, California:
Isaac Webster Holcomb, age 37, b. U.S.

1877 Voter Registration, Soque, Santa Cruz, California:
Isaac Websgter Holcomb, age 37, b. U.S.

1879, Voter Registration for Big Valley, Lassen County, California:
Isaac Webster Holcomb, age 50, b. U.S.

4 June 1880, Big Valley Twp., Lassen County, California:

45-45
Holcomb, Isaac W M 50 Farmer b. IL fb. MO mb. MO
-----Emily W F 49 Wife Keeping House b. IL fb. Y mb. PA
-----Stephen W M 28 Son Laborer b. CA fb. IL mb. IL
-----Hiram W M 26 Son Laborer b. CA fb. IL mb. IL
-----Walter J. W M 24 Son Laborer b. CA fb. IL mb. IL
-----Charles O. W M 22 Son Laborer b. CA fb. IL mb. IL
-----Alfred O. W M 14 Son At school b. CA fb. IL mb. IL
-----Edwin W M 11 Son At school b. CA fb. IL mb. IL
-----Oscar P. W M 7 Son b. CA fb. IL mb. IL

1882 Voter Registration, Big Valley, Lassen County, California:
Isaac W. Holcomb, age 53, b. Illinois

1884 Voter registration, Big Valley, Lassen County, California:
Isaac W Holcomb, age 53, b. Illinois

1886, Voter Registration, Big Valley, Lassen Coutny, California:
Isaac W. Holcomb, age 53, b. Illinois

1890, Voter Registration, Big Valley, Lassen County, California:
Isaac W Holcomb, 53, b. Illinois

1896-1898, Voter Registration, Bieber, Lassen County, California:
Isaac Webster Holcomb, age 67, b. Illinios

1898, Voter Registration, Bieber, Lassen County, California
Isaac Webster Holcomb, age 67, b. Illinois

The following newspaper notice is significant because it indicates that I.W. Holcomb of Lassen County, California had a nephew named James A. Holcomb:

Jas A. Holcomb of Surprise Valley was here last week visiting his uncle, I. W. Holcomb.
[Source: Big Valley Gazette; Lassen County, CA; Thurs., 17 March 1898]

By late 1898, I.W. Holcomb was in declining health:

I. W. Holcomb was reported much worse yesterday and Dr. Bradshaw was hastily summoned to his bedside.
[Source: Big Valley Gazette, Lassen County, CA; Wed., 21 Dec 1898]

1900 Voter Registration, Bieber, Lassen County, California:
Isaac Webster Holcomb, age 71, b. Illinois

11 June 1900, Twp. 4, Lassen County, California:

46-50
Holcomb, Isaac W Head W M b. Sept 1829 70 M-48 b. IL fb. MO mb. MO Dairyman
-----, Emily Wife W F July 1828 71 M-48 1-1 b. IL fb. NY mb. PA
-----, Edward Son W M b. Oct 1869 30 S b. CA fb. IL mb. IL farm laborer
-----, Alvin N. Grandson W M b. Mr 1884 16 S b. CA fb. CA mb. CA farm laborer

The following death notice for Mrs. Sarah Holcomb, widow of Nathaniel Holcomb, links Mrs. J.A. (Phoebe Holcomb) Owens and Isaac W. Holcomb together as siblings:

Died -- HOLCOMB -- at San Francisco, Nov. 14, Mrs. Sarah HOLCOMB, mother of Isaac W. HOLCOMB and Mrs. J.A. OWENS, formerly of this place, native of Missouri, aged 92 years.
[Source: The Free Lance; Hollister, CA, 16 Nov 1900]

Obituary for Isaac W. Holcomb:

DEATH OF I. W. HOLCOMB
Another pioneer has gone to his rest. Isaac W. Holcomb passed peacefully to the great beyond Monday morning at 10 o’clock. He had been ailing more or less for the last two years and was so feeble all this winter that his death was momentarily expected.

Isaac Webster Holcomb was born in Galena, Illinois, September 19th, 1829. He was among the early argonauts, who came here after the first discovery of gold, but instead of engaging in mining, settled down to a pastoral life and was among the first cattle raisers in California.

In 1851, he was married to the wife, who now survives him, and though several children preceded him to the grave, four sons and two daughters remain to mourn his loss.

In 1880, Mr. Holcomb moved with his family to this valley, where they have since resided, and that he was held in high esteem was attested by the large concourse of friends who followed the remains to the Mountain View Cemetery this afternoon.
[Source: Wed., Feb., 20, 1901; Big Valley Gazette, Bieber, Lassen Co., CA.]

Horace Edward Holcomb, b. 12 Oct 1869 in Santa Cruz Co., CA, married on 19 Nov 1913 in Anderson, Madison Co., Indiana to Emma Isabel Beezley b. 26 Oct 1885 in Steelville, Missouri. Horace's father: Isaac Holcomb and mother: Emily Imez. Emma's father: William Beezley and mother: Clarice E. Norris.
[Source: "Indiana Marriages, 1780-1992," database, FamilySearch]

Obituary record for Emily (Imus) Holcomb:

Obituary for Emily (Imus) Holcmb, who came to Big Valley in 1878,  was published 25 March 1915 in the Big Valley Gazette of Bieber, Lassen County, California

California Death Index:
Emily Holcome, aged 84, died 20 Mar 1915 in Lassen County, California
[Source: "California Death Index, 1905-1939," database with images, FamilySearch]

Cyrus Owens was evidently the author of the following letter to the Santa Cruz Sentinel in 1937 in which he names his grandfather Nathaniel Holcomb (the same Nathaniel Holcomb who traveled to Bolivia), an uncle Isaac Holcomb, and an uncle Alfred O. Holcomb [please pardon the tortured transcription]:

...to learn that my grandfather Nathaniel Holcomb settled in Santa Cruz county in 1850. He built the first wagon road over the mountains to San Jose. He crawled on his hands and knees to cut the underbrush and without the aid of surveying instruments picked out a grade that a team could head-trot over most of the way. The first stage that passed over this road was specially reserved for my grandmother and mother, no other passengers being carried. As a girl my mother stopped at the home of Elihu Anthony and attended school in Santa Cruz. My grandfather's place was 21 miles from Soquel on the Soquel creek. In December of 18?0 my grandfather went to South America where the Bolivian government gave him a tract of land three leagues square. From there he wrote some interesting letters which will be found in the files of the Santa Cruz Sentinel of 1867 or 1868. He and my uncle Alfred O. Holcomb were in possession of this land for seven years when my uncle advised us that my grandfather had passed away. We received two letters from my uncle after that. His last letter stated that he was going with a party of 50 men to explore the Beni river. We never heard from him again and every effort we made to trace him was fruitless. Almost ?? years ago my uncle, Isaac Holcomb ran a ??? between Soquel and Santa Cruz. --C.W. Owens, 1225 San Bruno Avenue, San Francisco.
[Source: Santa Cruz Sentinel, Santa Cruz, California, 20 Nov 1937]

Note C.W. Owens' address in the letter above. Cyrus Owens was living with his mother Phoebe Owens at 1225 San Bruno Ave., San Franciso, California on the 1910 and 1920 census.

This page last updated on Dec. 25, 2015



Thursday, November 12, 2015

Dewitt Lennon and the Swoose

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

I'm a day late with honoring Veteran's Day. I do not have many photographs of my immediate ancestors serving in uniform because generationally they missed all the American wars except the Revolution, the Civil War, and WWI. This is a photograph of my Uncle Dewitt Lennon, standing second from the right in the back row, with the crew of the Swoose, taken in Italy in 1944.



Dewitt Lennon, second from the right in the back row, with the crew of the Swoose
in Italy 1944. Kenneth G. Wiley is on the far left in the front row.

My uncle flew 57 missions as a B-17 waist gunner in Europe during WWII, earning "four awards of the Air Medal for his meritorious actions while engaged in aerial combat" (source: obituary). The Swoose was a rebuilt B-17D that was nicknamed "half swan and half goose," or Swoose. The inspiration was a quirky little song called "Alexander the Swoose" that was popular at the time (see below). She flew under the command of Frank Kurtz in both the Pacific and European theaters for the duration of the war. Today, the Swoose is the oldest surviving B-17 and the only D model in existence. It is being restored at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB in Fairborn, Ohio.

Frank Kurtz named his daughter Swoosie Kurtz, who was born while he was serving during the war, after the Swoose.

"Alexander the Swoose" by Kay Kyser and his Orchestra:






Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Sarah (King) Brundage - Sangamon County, Illinois

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Sarah Caroline King, daughter of Sarah (Earnest) and John King, married Daniel H. Brundage on 30 Nov 1854 in Sangamon County, Illinois. She was born 12 May 1837 in Sangamon County, Illinois and died on 11 Jan 1894 in Decatur, Macon County, Illinois with burial in Greenwood Cemetery. Husband, Daniel H. Brundage was born Oct 1834 and died 25 Sept 1905 in Springfield County, Illinois. He is buried beside his wife, "Caroline," in Greenwood Cemetery.

Shortly after their marriage, the Brundages removed to Dallas County, Texas, where Daniel paid taxes in 1857 and the family is found on the 1860 census.






D.H. Brundage paid taxes in Dallas County, Texas in 1857.

1860, Prct. #7, Dallas County, Texas:

Brundage, D.H. 25 M b. IL
-----Sarah C. 23 b. IL
-----Elizabeth A. 5 b. IL
-----Sarah F. 2 b. TX
-----Chas E. 0 M b. TX

By 1862, the Brundages had returned to Illinois, where daughter, Adeline was born about 1862. However, they removed to the Topeka, Kansas area sometime before 1870.

1 July 1870, Topeka Ward 1, Shawnee County, Kansas, P.O.: Topeka:

442-458
Brundage, D.H. 36 M W Keeper Boarding House $1,400-$0 b. IL
-----C. 34 F W Keeping house b. IL
-----Alice 14 F W b. IL
-----Nancy 12 F W b. TX
Burndage, Charles 10 M W b. TX
-----Adaline 8 F W b. IL
-----Albert 6 M W b. IL
-----Carolina 3 F W b. IL

1 June 1880, Beardstown, Cass County, Illinois, p. 707:

93-99
Brundage, Daniel W M 50 Laborer b. IL fb. KY mb. KY
-----Sarah W F 45 wife Keeps house b. IL fb. NC mb. NC
-----Charles W M 20 son Farm hand b. TX fb. IL mb. IL
-----Adeline W F 17 dau At Home b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
-----Albert W M 15 Work in Grocery b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
-----Joseph W M 7 son b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
----Noah W M 4 son b. IL fb. IL mb. IL

Son Joseph was born born in Kansas in 1872, which is not reflected in the 1880 census.

1 June 1900, Third Pct, 1228 E. Eight St., Springfield, Sangamon Co., IL:

58-61
Brundage, Charles Head W M Mar 1860 40 M-17 b. TX fb. IL mb. IL
-----Ruth Wife W F Dec 1861 38 M-17 2-2 b. IL fb. MO mb. IL
-----Claude son W M July 1885 14 S b. IL fb. TX mb. IL
-----Ethel dau W F Jan 1891 9 S b. IL fb. TX mb. IL
-----Daniel H. father W M Oct 1834 65 Wd b. IL fb. OH mb. VA

Obituaries for Sarah Caroline (King) Brundage:

BRUNDAGE--At her home in Decatur, Thursday, Jan. 11, of inflammation of the bowels, Mrs. Sarah C. Brundage, aged 56 years.

The deceased was born near this city, but for several years past has been a resident of Decatur. She leaves to mourn her loss seven children: Charles, Bert, Joseph and Miss Nora [sic] Brundage and Mrs. Alice Ford, all of Decatur; Mrs. Fannie Morrison, of Chatham, and Mrs. Ida Hart, of Colorado. The funeral occurred at 1 p.m. Saturday from the residence in Decatur .
[Source: Daily Illinois State Register; Springfield, IL; Tues., Jan. 16, 1894]

"Mrs. Brundage"
Mrs. Sarah C. Brundage, wife of D.H. Brundage, died Thursday, Jan. 11th, after a brief illness of inflammation of the bowels, aged 56 years. Mrs. Brundage was taken ill on Sunday and grew rapidly worse. She leaves a husband and seven children, all grown. They are Charles, Bert, Joseph and Noah Brundage and Mrs. Alice Ford of Decatur and Mrs. Fannie Morrison and Mrs. Ada Hart of Colorado.

Mrs. Brundage was born near Springfield, May 12, 1837, but for many years has been a resident of Decatur. She was an excellent Christian woman and a host of friends will mourn her death.
[Source: The Weekly-Herald Dispatch; Decatur, Illinois; Sat 20 Jan. 1894]

Obituaries for Husband Daniel H. Brundage:

Mortuary. Brundage - At the residence of his son, Bird Brundage, 116 West Carpenter street, at 4 a.m., Monday, Sept. 25, 1905, Daniel H. Brundage, aged 70 years and 10 months.

Mr. Brundage was born on a farm ten miles west of the city and resided there all his life. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Brundage, who were among the earliest settlers of this county, settling on land where the deceased was born and reared. In 1855 Mr. Brundage was united in marriage to Miss Sarah King, who died twelve years ago. Mr. Brundage had enjoyed good health up until a short time ago, and about ten days ago was taken ill with paralysis and was removed to St. John's hospital, but last Saturday his condition was such that he was removed to the home of his son, where his death occurred yesterday.

The deceased is survived by four sons, Charles and Bird Brundage of this city, Joseph and Noah Brundage, who reside in Davenport, Ia.; also by two daughters, Mrs. Addie Hart of Fort Collins, Colo., and Mrs. Conrad who lives in Iowa.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Register; Springfield, IL; Tues. 26 Sept 1905]

Brundage--The funeral of Daniel Brundage took place at 10 o'clock yesterday morning from the residence of the deceased's son, Bird Brundage, 116 Carpenter street, the Rev. D.G. Bradford pastor of the Portuguese Presbyterian church, officiating. At 2 o'clock in the afternoon the remains were sent to Decatur where the interment was made.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Register; Springfield, IL; Wed. 27 Sept 1905]

Brundage marriage and divorce records:

Joe Brundage, age 24, born in Topeka, Kansas, son of D.H. Brundage and Caroline Sarah King, married Viola Lee Shimer, age 27, born in Hillsboro, lllinois, daughter of J.H. Shimer and Lititia Harris, on 1 Jan 1896 in Davenport, Scott County, Iowa.

Albert Brundage Sues for Divorce
Albert Brundage wants a divorce from his wife, Laura Brundage. He filed suit yesterday afternoon in the circuit court, alleging desertion. The couple married in 1887 and lived together until 1897 when, the complainant alleges, Mrs. Brundage left him.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, Illinois; Tues. 19 Jan 1904]

Albert Brundage, aged 39, Springfield twp; and Josephine DeFrates, aged 44, 908 East Adams street.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, IL; Tues. 29 March 1904]

Noah Brundage, son of Daniel H. and Caroline King, age 29, born in Springfield, Illinois married Nellie E. Murray, age 30, born in Scott County, daughter of James E. Murray and Hattie E. Vieno, on 8 Feb 1905 in Buffalo, Scott County, Iowa.

Brundage - Upton--Married, at 8 o'clock Thursday evening, Jan 2, 1913, at the home of the bride, Judge J.B. Weaver officiating, Albert Brundage, 116 West Carpenter street, and Mary Frances Upton, 121 West Madison street.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, IL; Fri 3 Jan 1913]

Death records of Sarah (King) Brundage's children and their spouses:

Brundage - Mrs. Ethel Urban of this city, and Mrs. M. Broadus, of Decatur, have returned home from Excelsior Springs, Mo., where they attended the funeral of Charles E. Brundage, formerly of this city, which was held last week at Excelsior. Mrs. Urban is a daughter of Mr. Brundage. Mr. Brundage is also survived by three brothers, two of whom reside here, namely, Bert and Noah Brundage.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Register; Daily Illinois State Register; Springfield, IL; Tues. 16 Nov 1909]

Albert C. Brundage born 7 Sept 1864 in Illinois; died 27 June 1922 in Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois. Father: David Brundage b. IL. Mother: Caroline King b. IL. Occupation: trucker. Wife: Mary. Buried 30 June 1922. Oak Ridge Cemetery.
[Source: Illinios Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947, familysearch.org]

Joe Brundage, aged 60,  died 16 Apr 1933 in Decatur, Macon County, Illinois. Father: Daniel Brundage. Mother: Caroline King. Wife: Viola Lee Shimer Brundage
[Source: Illinios Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947, familysearch.org]

Brundage--Died at 2:15 o'clock Monday afternoon, Sept 16, 1912, at St. John's hospital following an operation, Mrs. Josephine Brundage, wife of Albert Brundage of 116 West Carpenter street, aged 53 years 1 month and 4 days.

The remains were removed to the residence of her sister, Mrs. Matt Kelly, 414 South Eighth street, where the funeral will be held at an hour to be announced later.

Decedent is survived by her husband, Albert Brundage, 116 West Carpenter street; her aged father, Mr. Miller of Peoria; six sisters, Mrs. Mattie Chase pf Peoria, Mrs. Flo Carrier of Peoria, Mrs. Mary Wilcox of Nebraska, Mrs. Rebecca Simpson of Peoria, Mrs. Anna Smith of Florida and Mrs. Matt Kelly of this city.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, Illinois; Tues. 17 Sept 1912]

Mrs. Mary Brundage
Mrs. Mary Frances Brundage, 67, of 419 W. Mason St., was pronounced dead at 7:20 a.m. yesterday at Memorial hospital, after apparently suffering a heart attack.

She was born May 8, 1889, in Springfield, and had resided here all her life. Her husband Albert Cook Brundage, died June 2, 1922. Mrs. Brundage was employed at Memorial hospital.

She is survived by her step-mother, Mrs. Laura Kirby; and two sisters, Miss Ellen E. Jacoby and Mrs. Walter Heiss, both of Springfield.

Mrs. Brundage was member of the Clementine Memorial Presbyterian church.

Remains are at the Vancil funeral home, where services will be held at 3 p.m. tomorrow. Rev. Milton W. Mosbacher will officiate and burial will be in Oak Ridge cemetery.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, IL; Thurs. 27 Dec 1956]

Saturday, October 31, 2015

Marie (Ingels) Ralston - Sangamon County, Illinois

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Marie Angeline (Ingels) Ralton, daughter of  Elizabeth (King) and John Ingels,  was born 1847 and died 28 June 1913. She married James Ralston born 1840 and died 20 March 1922. Both are buried in the Farmington Cemetery in Farmingdale, Sangamon County, Illinois

Death Caused by Paralysis
Mrs. Marie Ruston [sic] of Farmingdale Summoned
Deceased Was 66 Years Old - Born and Raised in Vicinity of Farmingdale
Two Brothers Live in This City

Ralston - Died, at 8:45 o'clock, Sunday night, June 29, 1913, at the Springfield hospital of paralysis, Mrs. Marie A. Ralston, wife of James H. Ralston, residing one and one-half miles southwest of Farmingdale, aged 66 years and 8 months.

Deceased was born in Farmingdale and had resided in that vicinity all of her life. She was married in 1874 to James Ralston. Surviving are her husband, and three brothers, John P. and James Ingles of this city and Charles K. Ingles of New Berlin.

The remains were removed to the undertaking establishment of E.P. Metcalf in South Fifth street and will later be taken to the family residence, where the funeral services will be held at a time to be announced later.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Register; Springfield, IL; Mon. 30 June 1913]

Ralston--The funeral services for Mrs. Marie A. Ralston wife of James H. Ralston, who died Sunday at Springfield hospital of paralysis, will be held at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the Presbyterian church in Farmingdale. Friends wishing to view the remains may do so between the hours of 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. today at the undertaking establishment of E. P. Metcalf in South Fifth street. At 4:10 o'clock they will be taken to the family residence at Farmingdale.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Register; Springfield, IL; Tues., July 1, 1913]

James H. Ralston, 81, Paid Final Tribute
Special to the State Journal.
Pleasant Plains. March 20.--Friends and relatives from throughout central Illinois gathered this afternoon to pay final tribute to the memory of James H. Ralston, 81 years old, who spent his entire life in Sangamon county.

Services were conducted at 1 o'clock at the home of his niece, Mrs. Sophia Irwin of Pleasant Plains, and at 2:30 o'clock at the Presbyterian church in Farmingdale, Rev. Meeker officiating.

Pallbearers were Oscar Whitcomb, Charles Watt, Charles Bomke, J.K. Knudson, Dan Kendall and D.G. Harms. Burial in Farmingdale cemetery.

Surviving are several nephews and nieces living in Sangamon county and the west. He was married in 1874 to Maria Angeline Ingels who died several years ago.
[Souce: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, IL; Tues., Mar. 21, 1922]

Census records for Marie (King) and James H. Ralston:

14 June 1880, Gardner Twp., Sangamon County, IL:

199-199
Ralston, James W M 39 Farmer b. IL fb. KY mb. KY
-----Maria W F 28 Wife Keeping house b. IL fb. KY mb. IL
-----Francis W F 78 Mother  b. KY fb. VA mb. VA
-----Elizabeth W F 57 cousin Keeping house b. Ind. fb. KY mb. KY
-----William W M 61 cousin Gardening b. KY fb. KY mb. KY
Engls, Elizabeth W F 18 s-i-l Teacher b. IL fb. KY mb. IL

Dumephry, John W M 18 Laborer Farm laborer b. IL fb. IL mb. IL

7 June 1900, Gardner Twp., Sangamon County, IL:

37-37
Ralston, James H. Head W M Aug 1840 59 M-21 b. IL fb.TN mb. KY
-----Mariah A. Wife M F Nov 1847 52 M-21 1-0 b. IL fb. KY mb. IL
Ingles John b-i-l W M Sept 1819 80 Wd b. KY fb. KY mb. VA
Morgan, John bo boz W M Sept 1887 12 S b. KS fb. IL mb. IL

Jeremiah King - Sangamon County, Illinois

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Jeremiah King, son of Sarah (Earnest) and John King, was born 19 Sept 1830 in Sangamon County, Illinois and died 19 March 1922 in Sangamon County, Illinois. He is buried in the Wood Wreath Cemetery in Sangamon County.

An honor roll was taken of the pioneers present, which was made as accurately as possible. One of the interesting characters of the day was Jeremiah King, 88 years of age, the only "snowbird" who was present. Mr. King was born on Sept. 19, 1830, the fall of the year of the big snow. He spent all his life on his farm on the Jacksonville road about twelve miles from Springfield until about twenty-five years ago, when he moved to the city, where he has resided ever since. He now lives on West Monroe street, but state yesterday that each time he visits the old farm on which his son, Roy, now lives, he feels that "somehow that is where he ought to stay." All but one of Mr. King's eight children are at the present time residing in Sangamon county.

In speaking of the days gone by Mr. King said: "I remember the time when the court house was fenced in with rail fence. This rotted away and was replaced with a post and rail structure." Concerning Lincoln, Mr. King said: "Lincoln's statue doesn't look as I  remember him. Perhaps that is because the sculptor couldn't make his great kind heart shine forth. Lincoln was a man with a big heart, once he knew a man he always knew him."
[Source: Daily Illinois State Register; Springfield, IL; Thurs. 29 Aug 1918]

J. King Is Dead At New Berlin
New Berlin, March 19 - Jeremiah King, 91 years old, died at 10 o'clock this morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W.G. Coons at New Berlin. He was the last surviving member of a family of seven, and was a pioneer of Sangamon county having been born in this county September 19, 1830.

Funeral services will be held at 1 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W.G. Coons. Burial will be in Wood Wreath cemetery.

He was the father of eleven children, eight of whom survive. They are: Mrs. J.W. Anthony, Bates City, Mo.; Mrs. W.G. Coons, New Berlin; Mrs. D. V. White of Bates City; Edward E. of Farmingdale; Earnest of New Berlin; Mrs. Jessie Houston of Springfield; Otis of New Berlin; Roy of Curran; twenty-three grandchildren and eight great grandchildren.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, IL; Mon. 20 March 1922]

Jeremiah King to be Buried Tomorrow
New Berlin, March 20 - Funeral services for Jeremiah King, 91 years old, who resided in Sangamon county during his entire life, will be conducted at 1 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W.G. Coons. Burial will be in Wood Wreath cemetery.

Mr. King died Sunday morning at the home of his daughter in New Berlin. He was the last survivor of a family of seven. Eight of his eleven children survive.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, IL; Tues. 21 March 1922]

Jeremiah King Will Filed For Probate

Directing executors to sell his property and divide it equally among his sons and daughters, the will of Jeremiah King was filed yesterday morning in the office of Probate Clerk O.G. Addleman.

Recognizing the fact, that several sons and daughters were given property during his life, Mr. King, in his will, directs that the amount that each has received be deducted from his or her share in the estate.

The will names the following heirs: Otis King, Ida B. Anthony, Sadie Coons, Elizabeth White, Edward E. King, Earnest King, Jessie Houston and Ray King. Edward King and Ernest King are named executors. The will was signed March 28, 1902.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, IL; Sun. 2 April 1922]

7 & 8 June 1880, New Berlin Twp. Sangamon County, Illinois:

60-61
King, Jeremiah W M 49 Farmer b. IL fb. KY mb. KY
-----Mary E. W F 36 wife Keepinghouse b. IL fb. KY mb. VA
-----Ida W F 16 dau b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
-----Sarah W F 14 dau b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
-----Anis W F 13 dau b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
-----Elizabeth W F 11 dau b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
-----Edward E. W M 9 son b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
-----Mary E. W F 7 dau b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
-----Ernest W M 5 son b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
-----Jesse W M 3 son b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
-----Otis W M 1 son b. IL fb. IL mb. IL
Eberhardt, John W M 25 Boarder b. IL fb. OH mb. OH

Elizabeth (King) Ingels - Sangamon County, Illinois

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Elizabeth King, daughter of Sarah (Earnest) and John King, married John Ingels.

Golden Wedding at Farmingdale.
Mr. and Mrs. John Ingels celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage at their home in Farmingdale yesterday. A magnificent dinner was spread, to which fifty or sixty persons sat down. Many valuable presents were made the aged couple. Mr. Alex Irwin presented them with a valuable present after a feeling speech. The present was a memento from neighbors and friends. The bride, Mrs. Ingels, and her bridesmaid, Mrs. Simon Rickard, wore wreaths of flowers. Andrew Craig, groomsman to Mr. Ingles fifty years ago, is now dead, but was remembered by the old friends present. James Parkinson's genial, happy face was much missed on this occasion.

Before the company dispersed R. W. Diller made a few remarks, comparing fifty years past with the present, after which John Ingles closed, expressing gratitude to friends and to God for his preserving care for so many years.

John Ingels was born in Lexington, Ky., September 2d, 1819. Miss Elizabeth King was born in Sangamon county February 1st, 1828. They were married on Spring Creek March 14, 1843, and have lived in this section ever since. Of eight children born to them six are now living. They are John T., Maria Angeline, (now Mrs. Ralston) Charles K., William, James U. and Elizabeth Ingels Scott.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Register; Springfield, IL; Wed., Mar 15, 1893]

Obituaries of John Ingels:

Ingels--Died, at 1:50 o'clock, Wednesday morning, Feb. 3, 1904, at the residence of his son-in-law, James Ralston, 311 South Douglas avenue, of senility, John Ingels, aged 84 years.

The decedent is survived by one daughter, Mrs. James Ralston of this city; three sons, Charles, of Sudduth, Ill., James and John Ingels, jr., of this city. Mr. Ingels was born in Kentucky, and had been a resident of Sangamon county for the last sixty-five years. He resided for a number of years near Farmingdale, and he enjoyed an extensive acquaintance throughout the county.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, Ill., Fri., Feb. 5, 1904]

Ingels--The funeral of John Ingels will be held at 11 o'clock tomorrow morning at New Salem M.E. church, Rev. Hartmann officiating. The interment will be made in the King cemetery.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, IL; Thurs., Feb. 4, 1904]

Ingels--The funeral of John Ingels took place yesterday at 11 a.m. from the New Salem Methodist church. The attendance was large. The Rev. Thomas Hartman, pastor of the Chatham Methodist officiating. Burial was in the King cemetery.

The pallbearers were George Washburn, D. V. White, W. G. Coons, James Kennedy, William Kennedy and William Morrison.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Register; Springfield, IL; Sat., Feb. 6, 1904]

Sarah (Earnest) King

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Sarah Earnest, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Sims) Earnest, married John King.

KING, JOHN, was born Jan. 22, 1804, in Kentucky. He was a brother to Jeremiah King, came to Sangamon county about 1821, and was married Feb. 18, 1824, to Sarah Earnest. They had ten children, three of whom died in infancy.
Of the other seven--

WILLIAM E., born June 12, 1826, married Almyra Bradley. He died Feb. 16, 1856, leaving a widow and two children. She married Henry Morgan. He died, and she resides near Fredonia, Kansas.

ELIZABETH, born Feb. 1, 1828, in Sangamon county, married March 14, 1843, to John Ingels.

JEREMIAH, born Sept. 19, 1830, married Aug. 29, 1862, to Mary E. Douglas, who was born Sept. 19, 1843, in Sangamon county. They have six children, IDA, SARAH, ANNIS, ELIZABETH, EDWARD, and MARY, and reside two and one-half miles west of Curran.

JOHN E., born Dec. 21, 1832, married Mary Campbell; have four children and live near Fredonia, Kansas.

CHARLES W.,  born July 6, 1835, married Oct. 3, 1872, to Virginia Beach, and lives with his mother.

SARAH C., born May 12, 1836, married Daniel H. Brundage; have six children, and reside in Iola, Allen county, Kansas.

MARTHA F., born March 18, 1839, married Feb. 14, 1860 to Jacob J. Ingels, who was born Aug. 25, 1834, in Bourbon county, Ky. They had three children. The two youngest died in infancy. Mrs. Ingles died May 23, 1866. LIZZIE, born Sept. 14, 1861, is the eldest child, and the only member of the family living, resides with her grandmother King.

John King died Dec. 29, 1838, and his widow resides four miles northwest of Curran, Sangamon county.
[Source: History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois]

Obituary of Sarah (Earnest) King:

Death of a Venerable Lady...Mrs. Sarah King, relict of the late John King, died at her residence in Curran township, eight miles west of the city, on Friday afternoon last, at half-past three o'clock. On Tuesday she was taken down with a congestive chill, and gradually sank until death occurred, as above. Mrs. King was the daughter of Jacob Earnest, who settled on Spring creek, in this county, as early as 1819. She was born on the 7th of April, 1806, in Kentucky, and was married in this county to John King on the 18th of February, 1824. He died on the 29th of February, 1838, leaving her with a family of seven children, all of whom she succeeded in raising to worthy men and women. She possessed all of the rugged virtues that were distinguishing characteristics of many of the pioneer women, and died as she lived, with the respect of all with whom she came into contact. She was for fifty years a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has not entered upon the rewards of a well spent life. Register.
[Source: Daily Illinois State Journal; Springfield, IL; Mon., Nov. 24, 1879]

23 Oct 1850, Sangamon County, Illinois:

1134-1134
Sarah King 44 F $1,500 b. KY
Jermiah King 18 M Farmer b. IL
John King 17 M Farmer b. IL
Chas. King 16 M Farmer b. IL
Sarah King 13 F b. IL
Martha King 11 F b. IL
Wm. King 24 M Farmer b. IL
Elmira King 21 F b. NC
Laura King 6/12 b. IL

1860, Dist 16, Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois:

Ingols, J.J. M 24 b. KY
-----Martha F 21 IL
King, Sarah F 55 b. KY
Ingols, G G F 20 b. KY

24 June 1870, Curran, Sangamon County, Illinois:

139-139
King, Chas W. 34 M W Farmer $5,000-$600 b. IL
-----Sarah 64 F W K. House b. KY
Engles, Elizabeth 8 F W b. IL
Winston, William 23 M W Agent $11,000 b. IL
Abernathy, James 24 M W Farmer $0-$300 b. Iowa


Children of Sarah (Earnest) and John King:

1. William E. King married Almyra Bradley
2. Elizabeth King married John Ingels
3. Jeremiah King married Mary E. Douglas
4. John E. King married Mary Campbell
5. Charles W. King married Virginia Beach
6. Sarah C. King married Daniel H. Brundage
7. Martha F. King married Jacob J. Ingels

Robert S. McMurray

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Robert S. McMurry, son of Lavina (Earnest) and James McMurry, was born 9 Nov 1828 in Sangamon County, Illinois. He died 23 Feb 1913 in Wallace, Calaveras County, California. He is buried in the Ione Public Cemetery, Ione, Amador County, California. He married Elizaeth Reno on 30 Oct 1867 in Amador County, California.

6 July 1870, Twp. 2, Ione City, Amador County, California:

161-161
McMurry, R.S. 42 M W Farmer $2,000-$800 b. IL
-----Elizabeth 32 F W Keeping House b. OH
-----W. W. 17 M W At Home b. IL
-----Mary 14 F W At Home b. CA
-----Leuella 13 F W At Home b. CA
-----Frank 12 M W At Home b. Ca
-----Alta 11 F W At Home b. CA
-----O.M. 9 F W At Home b. CA
-----H. Grant 6/12 M W At Home b. CA (Oct)
162-162
Merkel, E. 31 M W Farmer $0-$200 b. Hamburg
-----Lavina 19 F W Keeping House b. Iowa
-----Mary A. 1 F W At Home b. CA
Merkel, Frank 33 M W Farmer Laborer b. Hamburg

Robert McMurray was agreeably surprised on Wednesday, November 9, 1910 it being his 82 birthday, when his brother and two sisters which are all that is left of a large family, and his seven children came to ay him a visit, it being the first time in several years that all were together. Two grandchildren and one great grand child were present. Among those present were: Jas. McMurray and wife of Ione; Mrs. I.B. Gregory of Ione; Mrs. Frank Dickey of Stockton; brother and sister of Mr. Murray, the children, Wm. McMurray and wife, Mrs. --- Merrill, Robert McMurray, all of Stockton; Mrs. E. Merkel of Ione; Mrs. Louella Streeter of Modesto; Mrs. Alta Malloy and Grant McMurray of Wallace; Mr. and Mrs. Shackelford of Stockton and Lawrence Malloy and Wilda Carr of Wallace. He was the recipient of ninety very pretty birthday cards and three very handsome cakes. The table was heavily laden with all the delicacies the ladies know how to prepare. Pictures were taken of the different groups. They all went home wishing their father and brother many more birthdays.--Prospect.
[Source: Amador Ledger; Jackson, California; 25 Nov 1910]

Martha Jane (McMurry) Gregory

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Martha Jane McMurry, Lavina (Earnest) and James McMurry, married Inglefield B. Gregory on 2 March 1843 in Lee County, Iowa. She was born about 8 March 1827 in Sangamon County, Illinois and died on 21 Feb 1816 in Ione, Amador County, Illinois. She  buried beside her husband, Inglefield Buril Gregory, in Ione Public Cemetery. He was born 5 April 1819 in Sumner County, Tennessee and died 7 March 1883 in Ione, Amador County, California.

I.B. GREGORY
Was born in Sumner county, Tennessee, April 5, 1819, and for the succeeding thirteen years remained a resident of that State. His advantages for obtaining an education were somewhat limited, but he managed, by energy and close attention to his studies, to acquire a knowledge of the common branches, to which he added, in after years, a large amount of practical knowledge, which places him on a firm basis in that direction. In 1832 he removed from Tennessee to the State of Missouri, where he remained until 1846, at which time he went to Texas, and for about three years was a resident of that State. In 1849 he again emigrated, this time to Iowa, and stayed there three years, and then returned to Missouri. One year later he started for California by way of the plains, and after experiencing the usual incidents connected with such a trip, reached his objective point and located at Ione City, Amador county, where he followed the occupation of contractor and builder. In 1862 Mr. Gregory was elected a Supervisor of his district, serving in that position about three years. In 1867 - 68, he represented his people in the Assembly of the State Legislature, in a very creditable manner to himself and to entire satisfaction of his constituents, and was solicited to again accept the nomination for the same office, but declined. Mr. Gregory possesses the enviable distinction of being almost the only man ever elected to office in the county who did not urge his canvass with whiskey. Some years since he joined a temperance society, the secretary of which firmly posted the two sheets containing his signature and pledge, together, in consequence of which he cannot erase his name, and still feels bound by the obligation. His honor and integrity are the brightest jewels of his character. About three years since he removed from Ione City to his present home in Jackson valley, a view of which is to be found in this volume. Mr. Gregory was married to Miss Martha Jane McMurry, March 2, 1843; nine children are living at the present time to bless their union, one being laid to rest to meet them no more on earth.
[Source: History of Amador County, California: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Jesse D. Mason]


Obituary of Martha Jane (McMurry) Gregory:

Mrs. I.B. Gregory, who came to California across the plains in 1853 and ever since had been a resident of Ione, Amador County, passed away at that place February 21. She was a native of Illinois, aged 90 years, and is survived by a large family of children.
[Source: The Grizzly Bear, 1915 by J. Rush Bronson, Clarence M. Hunt]

1860, Twp. 2, Amador County, CA:

Gregory, I B 41 M W b. TN
-----Martha 33 F W b. IL
-----Sarah 14 F W b. MO
-----Martha 12 F W b. TX
-----John H 10 M W b. Iowa
-----Mary J 8 F W b MO
-----Jas M 5 M W b. CA
-----Malzine 2 F b. CA

Daughter Malzena B. Gregory died 21 June 1960 in Ione, Amador County, California and is buried in the Ione Public Cemetery.

Births. In Ione City, March 28th, the wife of I.B. Gregory, of a son.
[Source: Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento, CA, 31 Mar 1869]

28 June 1870, Twp. #2, Amador County, California, P.O. Ione City:

52-52
Gregory, I.B. 51 M W Carpenter $4,500 - $1,000 b. TN
-----Mary J. 43 F W Keeping House b. IL
-----John H. 20 M W Farm Laborer $0 - $75 b. Iowa
-----Mary J. 16 F W At Home b. MO
-----James M. 14 M W At Home b. CA

5 June 1880, Twp. 2, Amador County, California:

153-153
Gregory, I.B. W M 61 Farmer b. TN fb. VA mb. TN
-----William M W 18 son Works on farm b. CA fb. TN mb. IL
-----James T W M 17 son Works on farm b. CA fb. TN mb. IL
-----Edgar G W M 15 son Works on farm b. CA fb. TN mb. IL
-----Eugene W M 11 Son b. Works on farm b. CA fb. TN mb. IL
-----Martha J. W F 53 Wife Keeping house b. IL fb. KY mb. KY
[note: census is very dark]

4 June 1900, Ione, Amador County, California:

40-41
Gregory, Martha Head W F March 1827 73 Wd 10-9 b. IL fb. VA mb. KY
-----Eugene Son W M March 1868 F S b. CA fb. TN mb. IL
McMurry, Mattie Niece W F Sept 1882 17 S b. CA fb. IL mb. AL
-----Eddie Nephew W M April 1886 14 S b. CA fb. IL mb. AL
-----Hulda Niece W F Feb 1888 12 S b. CA fb. IL mb. AL
--42
Violett, Henry Head W M July 1877 22 M-0 b. CA fb. KY mb. TX
-----Josephine Wife W F July 1878 21 M-0 0-0 b. CA fb. unk mb. LA

Gregory Death Records:

Edgar Grant Gregory, b. 1 Mar 1866 in CA, died 23 Dec 1940 in San Francisco, CA.
Father: Gregory. Mother: McMurry.

Friday, October 30, 2015

Lavinia (Earnest) McMurry

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Lavina Earnest, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Sims) Earnest, married James McMurry. Lavina (Earnest) McMurry died 6 May 1891 and is buried in Ione Public Cemetery, Ione, Amador County, California. Her husband, James McMurry died 23 April 1859 is buried beside her.

MCMURRY, JAMES, born April 5, 1798, in Botetourt county, Virginia, was married in Sangamon county, Ill., to Lavina Earnest. They had six children in Sangamon county, and moved to Keokuk, Iowa; from there to Independence, Mo., thence to California, about 1855. Of their children, SARAH married Rev. Mr. James. She died in 1854, leaving one child. Martha J. married Inglefield Gregory. ROBERT S. married in 1849, and his wife died Nov. 16, 1863, leaving children, Luella, Alta, Sarah, Mary L., William H. and Olive M. THOS. FRANK, JAMES and ELIZA,--the three latter are married. James McMurry died near Ione City, California, and his family reside there.

[Source: History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois: "Centennial Record" by John Carroll Power and Sarah A. Harris p. 506-7]

McMurry marriages in Lee County, Iowa:


Martha McMurry married Inglefield Gregory on 2 Mar 1843

Sarah McMurry married John James on 4 Feb 1847
[Source: familysearch.org]

5 Sept 1850, Montrose Twp., Lee County,  Iowa:


309-315

James McMurray 52 M Farmer $1,500 b. VA
Lavina 45 F b. KY
Thomas N. 15 M Farmer b. IL
Francis A. 13 M b. IL
James 6 M b. Iowa
Eliza 3 F b. Iowa
Robert Nousan 2 M b. Iowa
310-316
Robert S. McMurray 21 M Farmer b. IL
Mary 25 F b. KY

McMurry Marriages in Amador County, California:


P.H. Egan married M.E. McMurry 2 Sept 1866

F.A. McMurry married C.C. Hamrick 6 Sept 1866
Robt S. McMurry married E. Reno 30 Oct 1867
Jas W. McMurry married Mrs. Mary Billington 14 June 1874 in Ione
[Source: familysearch.org]

28 June 1870, Twp. #2, Amador County, California, P.O.: Ione City: 

57-57

McMurray, J.W. 26 M W Apothecary $0-$2,000 b. IL
-----, Lavina 65 F W Keeping House b. IL
[By 1870, Lavina (Earnest) McMurry was a widow, living with her son James W. McMurry]

25 June 1880, Sheep Ranch, in 7th Twp. (Washington), Calaveras County, California:

Egan, P.H. W M 42 Hotel Keeper b. Mich fb. Ireland mb. Ireland
-----Mary E. W F 33 Wife Keeping house b. Iowa fb. VA b. KY
-----Etta May W F 13 Dau Goes to school b. CA fb. Mich mb. Iowa
-----Frank A. W M 11 Son Goes to school b. CA fb. Mich mb. Iowa
-----Bertie M. W F 7 Dau Goes to school b. CA fb. Mich mb. Iowa
-----Henry E. W M 2 Son b. CA fb. Mich mb. Iowa
McMurray, Lavina W F 75 m-i-l Assists dau b. KY fb. SC mb. SC
-----Alta W F 20 niece Waiter  b. CA fb. IL mb. TN


Not of Unusual Age
Yet She Could County Ninety-nine
Of Her Progenitors
            Mrs. Levina McMurray died at Ione, Amador County, on the 6th inst, aged 86 years, after a residence in that village of thirty-eight years. She was the mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and great-great grandmother of a family of ninety-nine, seventy-nine of whom survive her. Her husband James McMurray, died three years after arriving in California, since which time she has resided with some one of her children, at the time of her death being domiciled at the house of her daughter, Mrs. L. B. Gregory. The surviving family consists of six children, thirty-five grandchildren, thirty-six great-grandchildren and three great-great grandchildren, all living in California. Two sons, Robert S. and Francis McMurray, are engage in farming near Redding. Thomas McMurray, another son, is similarly occupied near Merced, while James McMurray, the youngest son, is Postmaster at Ione. One daughter, Mrs. Eliza Eagan, resides at Sheep Ranch, Calaveras County, while the other daughter is Mrs. L.B. Gregory of Ione.
            During all the years of her widowhood Mrs. McMurray was devoted to the interests of those she loved, while giving much of her time to the Methodist Church, of which she was a devout member. Mrs. McMurray was known by a large circle of friends, by whom she became familiarly called “Grandma.” The memory of her deeds of Christian charity will long survive. During her last illness she objected to the administration of remedies prescribed by the attending physicians, saying she was
“ready to do to her Savior,” and requested the members of the family who were at her bedside to sing “Jesus, lover of my soul, let me to thy bosom fly.” The request was complied with, and then the venerable woman clasped the hand of her granddaughter and said: “Make haste; let us go.” She died in the full consciousness of having served God during a long and useful life and without regrets that this summons had not come before, and rejoiced that it had found her prepared at the eventful moment.
[Source: San Francisco Call, 20 May 1891]

Page last updated on 18 December 2016


Thursday, October 29, 2015

Elizabeth (Sims) Earnest - Sangamon County, Illinios

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Elizabeth Sims, sister to Rev. James Sims and Rev. William Sims, was also an aunt to John Sims and Nancy (Sims) Kelley. Like her siblings, she migrated to Sangamon County, Illinois. She married Jacob Earnest, supposedly in South Carolina - possibly in Spartenburg County, South Carolina. The birth dates for both Jacob and Elizabeth, as they are provided in The History of the Early Settlers in Sangamon County, seem to be in error by 20 years each. Each would have been under ten years old when second daughter Sarah Earnest was born. Jacob's tombstone in Hancock County, Illinois provides a birth date of 1779, and Elizabeth's tombstone in Sangamon County, Illinois provides a birth date of 1778. Both of these dates seem more accurate, and indicate that a search of records for Jacob and Elizabeth need to expanded by 20 years. Additionally, the birth date of 1824 in Kentucky for daughter Lavina Earnest seems to also be in error. By 1824, the Earnest family was firmly established in Illinois. Jacob Sims was a brother to Thomas Earnest, who also removed to Sangamon County, Illinois. Since, Elizabeth (Sims) Earnest was my husband's ancestor, I have more information on the Earnests.

Published biographies for Jacob Earnest that include Elizabeth Sims:

Jacob Earnest was born April 24, 1799, in South Carolina, was married there to Elizabeth Sims, who was born April 26, 1798. She was a sister of James and William Sims, one of whom was older and the other younger than herself. They moved to that part of Simpson which later became Logan county, Kentucky. In 1817, the family moved to St Clair county, Illinois, and they moved to what became Simpson county, Illinois, arriving in the fall of 1819, on Spring creek, in what is now Curran township.
[Source: History of Sangamon County, Illinois: Together with Sketches of its Cities; Chapter XXXVI, Township of Curran, Interstate Publishing, 1881. p. 103]

EARNEST, JACOB, born April 24, 1799, in South Carolina, was married there to Elizabeth Sims, who was born April 26, 1798. She was a sister of James and William Sims, one of who was older and the other younger than herself.  They moved to that part of Simpson which later became Logan county, Ky., where they had seven children. In 1817 the family moved to St. Clair county, Ill., where they had one child, and they moved to what became Sangamon county, Ill., arriving in the fall of 1819, on Spring Creek, in what is now Curran township, where one child was born. Of their nine children--

LAVINA, born Nov. 28, 1824, in Kentucky, was married in Sangamon county, Ill., to James McMurry. He died, leaving a widow and six children near Ione City, Ione Valley, California.

SARAH, born April 7, 1806, in Kentucky, was married Feb. 18, 1824, in Sangamon county, Ill., to John King.

WILLIAM, born August 18, 1807, in Kentucky, was married in Sangamon county, Ill., to Jane Parks. They had five children. Mr. Earnest and three of the children died near Northfield, Iowa. Mrs. Earnest died there, Dec. 7, 1870, and the children reside near Northfield.

ROBERT, born April 6, 1810, in Kentucky, was married in Sangamon county to Susan Kendall. They had one child, SUSAN A., born Jan 25, 1831, married James Turner. He died and his widow married Henry B. Chambers. Robert Earnest died Sept. 22, 1831, and his widow married Joseph Ralston.

MAHALA, born Dec. 18, 1811, in Kentucky, was married in Sangamon county to James Parkinson.

GRIZELLA, born April 8, 1813, in Kentucky, was married in Sangamon county, Ill., to Martin L. C. Kendall. Mrs. Kendall and her two children died.

RACHEL, born March 5, 1816, in Kentucky, was married in Sangamon county, Ill., to Rezin D. Brown.

HENRIETTA, born April 3, 1818, in St. Clair county, Ill., was married in Sangamon county, March 22, 1838, to James V. Ingles.

SOPHIA, born April 2, 1820, in Sangamon county, married Amos W. Brown. Mrs. Brown died.

Mrs. Elizabeth Earnest died March 1, 1831, and Jacob Earnest married Rebecca Blunt. They had two children, and moved to Hancock county, Ill., Of their children--

ELIZABETH, born Sept. 29, 1833, in Sangamon county, was married July 29, 1852, to William Jones. They had eight children, JACOB H., FRANCES M., MARY M., EMMA A., IANTHA B., IDA M., WILLIAM B., and LIBBIE. William Jones drowned Jan. 1, 1869, while crossing the Mississippi river. Mrs. Elizabeth Jones was married Dec. 1, 1870, to William Isenberger. They have two children, GEORGE W. and RACHEL, and reside near Appanoos, Hancock county, Ill.

JACOB H., born August 18, 1836, in Sangamon county, married in Hancock county, Feb. 19, 1860, to Elizabeth Riman, who was born May 16, 1836. They have five children, EDWARD M., HENRIETTA, LYDIA F., ALVIN P. and ZENA MAY, and reside near Appanoos, Hancock county, Ill.

Jacob Earnest died Sept. 29, 1842, and Mrs. Rebecca Earnest died March 8, 1858, both in Hancock county, Ill.
[Source: History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois: "Centennial Record" by John Carroll Power, Sarah A. Harris, p. 274-5]

Jacob Earnest in St. Clair County, Illinois:

Jacob Earnest was a voter in the Tuesday, September 17, 1818 election in St. Clair County, Illinois. This was the first election held in St. Clair county, after the admission of Illinois as a state.
[Source: History of St. Clair County, Illinois ]

In 1826 Jacob Earnest, living in Sangamon County, Illinois, was involved in a political firestorm over a letter to the newspaper that alleged he did not write:

From the Illinois Intelligencer
(The following is the letter referred to by Mr. Kinney in the preceding page.)

Mr. Editor,
SIR - Mr. Kinney has been electioneering in this county, [Sangamon] and in doing which he has falsely misrepresented facts, no doubt with a design to deceive the people, as he has been in the habit of doing: had he not have called into question the transaction between the undersigned and himself, I would not have said any thing about him. Kinney seven years since, borrowed of the subscriber $1,000, in Georgia and Carolina money, which was to be paid when the subscriber's land should come into market, in land office money, and eight per cent interest; now, Kinney states in this county, that he proffered to pay the same in state paper at its specie value when called on, as he had not the specie, which is absolutely false, and without the shadow of truth. The facts are as follows: Kinney attempted to persuade the subscriber, after holding out that he could not pay him on account of misfortune, to exchange his (Kinney's) paper with Smith Crane, for work, and some cash, at a credit, at the same time informing the subscriber that Crane was good; when in fact and in truth the said Crane owed Kinney more, even after deducting the amount that Kinney owed me, than he could pay; which arrangement was not at that time entered into. The subscriber again called on Kinney and offered to take state paper at its specie value, which Kinney refused to do but offered it to him at two for one- this was in the fall of 1823, at which the state paper was worth about 30 cents to the dollar; less than three for one. Finding then that he could not get his pay from Kinney, and that Kinney was trying to keep him out of his money in a manner which the subscriber considered dishonest this together wit the representations of Mr. Kinney, induced the subscriber to exchange Kinney's paper to Crane; and as soon as Mr. Kinney ascertained that his paper had been exchanged, he immediately took a bill out of sale of all Crane's property, which cut the subscriber off--and has been the means of almost reducing him to complete poverty--at all events, it has the effect of keeping him out of a home, and from purchasing the land on which he had expended three years labor, unless he borrowed money at a high interest; these Mr. Editor, are the facts of this transaction, which I consider base and dishonorable. I should not have published the transaction had not Mr. Kinney sneakingly misrepresented the facts. Before closing this, I must make one more remark--Mr. Kinney has been advocating the canal in the county and denying that he ever was opposed to it, except that he considered it an unfit time to cut the canal; he has likewise taken to himself the credit of the memorial to the last legislature to Congress; you, sir, know that this is also untrue, and I should be glad to have Mr. K's opposition make known to the people.
Yours,
Jacob Earnest
[Source: Edwardsville Spectator; Edwardsville, IL; Fri. 14 July 1826]

The Rev. Wm. Kinney occupies a large space in our paper to-day, in clearing his private character from the imputation cast upon it by Mr. Earnest. We hope he may be successful. It would afford us great pleasure to find that his private transactions comport with his scared calling. But there are some insinuations against other candidates for public office, which ought not to be received without caution. We do not believe, and challenge the proof, that Mr. Earnest was instigated to the publication of his charge by any of the candidates for high offices who are opposed to Mr. Kinney's election. More hereafter.
[Source: Edwardsville Spectator; Edwardsville, IL; Fri. 14 July 1826]

Children of Jacob and Elizabeth (Sims) Earnest:

1. Lavinia Earnest married James McMurry
2. Sarah Earnest married John King
3. William Earnest married Jane Parks
4. Robert Earnest married Susan Kendall
5. Mahala Earnest married James Parkinson
6. Grizella Earnest married Martin L. C. Kendall
7. Rachel Earnest married Rezin D. Brown [my husband's direct line ancestors]
8. Henrietta Earnest married James V. Ingles
9. Sophia Earnest married Amos W. Brown

Children of Jacob and Rebecca (Blunt) Earnest:

10. Elizabeth Earnest married 1.) William Jones and 2.) William Isenberger
11. Jacob Earnest married Elizabeth Riman

This page last updated on December 20, 2016.



Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Robert Simms

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Robert Simms, son of Rev. William and Delilah (Welch) Sims, seems to have been a bachelor.

Obituary of Robert Simms:

Robert Simms, one of the oldest settlers of Rock Island county, died on Friday morning last at the residence of William Whiteside, with whom he has resided for several years. His funeral sermon was preached Sunday last by Rev. Mr. Davis at the Methodist church. The minister read the following obituary: Robert Simms was born in Kentucky in 1807. His father was known as Rev. William Simms, of the Methodist church. He came from St. Claire county to Illinois in 1816, then moved to Sangamon county in 1825, coming to Rock Island county in 1827. He was one of a family of 10 children. He died May 27, 1892. Mr.Simms lived a life of single blessedness and was reported to be a man of considerable means, which consisted of notes out at interest.
[Source: Rock Island Daily Argus; Rock Island, IL; 2 June 1892]

Jemima Ann (Simms) Timberlake

© Kathy Duncan, 2015

Jemima Simms, daughter of Rev. William and Delilah (Welch) Sims,  married Robert Douglas Timberlake.

Obituary of Robert D. Timberlake Jr., son of Jemima (Simms) and Robert D. Timberlake Sr.:

OLD COUNTY PIONEER DIES SATURDAY NIGHT
ROBERT D. TIMBERLAKE SUCCUMBS AT THE HOME OF DAUGHTER
Funeral Services Held at Home Monday Afternoon—Resident of Mason Township—Active Politician of County for Many Years.
Robert. D. Timberlake.
Robert D. [ouglas] Timberlake, who was stricken with pneumonia a few days ago, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. T. [homas] E. [lliott] Anderson, at 5:30 Saturday evening. A weak heart and a kidney trouble of long standing caused complications impossible for one of his age to resist.

Funeral services were held from his late home in Mason township Monday, December 13, at 1 p. m., conducted by Rev. C. W. Proctor, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church at Gravity and the Gilead church. Interment was in the Graceland cemetery west of town.

Deceased had been a resident of Mason Township for more than forty years, where he took a piece of raw prairie land and improved it until it is one of the best farms in the township. He has always taken an active part in the affairs of his township and county, and took a decided and aggressive stand on public questions, being fearless in the advocacy of what he believed to be right.

An ardent believer in democratic principles, deceased was active in local politics and was in one campaign for state representative, receiving a flattering vote for a minority candidate in the November election.

As a friend and neighbor he was highly esteemed and will be greatly missed by all who knew him.

Robert Douglas Timberlake was born at the old Timberlake homestead near Alpha, Henry County, Illinois, October 24, 1844, and died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. T. [homas] E. [lliott] Anderson, Dec. 10, 1915, aged 71 years, 1 month and 16 days.

He was the son of Robert and Jemima [Ann Simms] Timberlake. His early life was spent near the old home in Illinois. In 1866 he was married to Minnie [Amanda] M. [elissa] Gamble of Woodhull, Ill., where they lived until 1874, when they moved to Taylor county, settling on the farm where they have continuously resided since.

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Timberlake, all of whom are living. They are Harry P. [ierce] Timberlake, who lives on the home farm in Mason township, Mrs. Nellie [Bly] Sparks, near New Market, Mrs. Bertha [Blanche] Anderson of Bedford and Claude I. [rvin] Timberlake, who is now in Havana, Cuba. All except the latter were present at the funeral. In addition to the above named children, deceased had nine grandchildren, five boys and four girls, who are left to mourn the loss of a kind and indulgent grandfather, whose cheerful stories will always be to them a loving memory.

Deceased was of a family of thirteen children, ten of whom grew to manhood and womanhood. Seven of these are still living, five sisters and two brothers. They are J. [oseph] M. [adison] Timberlake of Greenfield, Iowa; W. [illiam] S.[imms] Timberlake of Alpha, Ill.; Mrs. J. A. [ugust] Sherbeck [Ann] of Oelwein, Iowa; Mrs. H. J. [osiah] Tilden [Delilah Jane] of Lincoln, Neb.; Mrs. W.[illiam] T. Furlong [Lucy Ellen] of Rochelle, Ill.; Mrs. John J. Walbert, Chicago, Ill., and Mrs. A. [rthur] S.[tanberry] Wainwright [Susan] of Mason Township. His sister Mary died fifty years ago and his twin brother George [Washington] twenty years ago, since which time there has not been a death in the family.

Mrs. Timberlake died Feb. 16, 1899, her death being caused by the same malady that caused the death of Mr. Timberlake.

Relatives from a distance who attended the funeral were W. [illiam] J. [ay] Furlong, Jr., Rochelle, Ill., and W. [illiam] S. [imms] Timberlake and O. [tis] B.[rown] Timberlake of Alpha, Ill.
[Source: Bedford Free Press; Taylor County, Iowa; Tues. 14 Dec 1915]

Robert D. Timberlake
Robert D. [ouglas] Timberlake died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. T.[homas] E. [lliott] Anderson, in Bedford at 5:30 o'clock Friday evening. Funeral services were held at 1 o'clock Monday afternoon at the farm home in Mason Township, conducted by Rev. C. C. Proctor, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church at Gravity, who also officiates at the Gilead church. Interment was in Graceland cemetery.

While there were many older settlers, Mr. Timberlake came here in time to take up prairie land in Mason Township, in 1874, and that has since been his home. He acquired a wide acquaintance in Taylor County and was one of the active men of the community during his entire life. Politically he was a democrat, and was frequently honored by his party.

Robert Douglas Timberlake was born at the old Timberlake homestead near Alpha, Henry County Illinois, October 24, 1844.

He was the son of Robert and Jemima [Ann Simms] Timberlake. His early life was spent near the old home in Illinois. In 1866 he was married to Minnie [Amanda] M. [elissa] Gamble of Woodhull, Ill., where they lived until 1874, when they moved to Taylor County, settling on the farm where they have continuously resided since.

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Timberlake, all of whom are living. They are Harry P. [ierce] Timberlake, who lives on the home farm in Mason Township, Mrs. Nellie [Bly] Sparks, near New Market, Mrs. Bertha [Blanche] Anderson of Bedford and Claude I. [rvin] Timberlake who is now in Havana, Cuba. All except the latter were present at the funeral. In addition to the above named children, deceased had nine grandchildren, five boys and four girls, who are left to mourn the loss of a kind and indulgent grandfather, whose cheerful stories will always be to them a loving memory.

Deceased was of a family of thirteen children, ten of whom grew to manhood and womanhood. Seven of these are still living, five sisters and two brothers. They are J. [oseph] M. [adison] Timberlake of Greenfield, Iowa; W. [illiam] S.[imms] Timberlake of Alpha, Ill.; Mrs. J. A. [ugust] Sherbeck [Ann] of Oelwein, Iowa; Mrs. J. [osiah] H. [erbert] Tilden [Delilah Jane] of Lincoln, Neb.; Mrs. W. [illiam] J. [ay] Furlong [Lucy Ellen] of Rochelle, Ill.; Mrs. John J. Walbert, Chicago, Ill; and Mrs. A. [rthur] S. [tanberry] Wainwright [Susan] of Mason Township. His sister Mary died fifty years ago and his twin brother George twenty years ago, since which time there has not been a death in the family.

Mrs. Timberlake died Feb. 16, 1899, her death being caused by the same malady that caused the death of Mr. Timberlake.

Relatives from a distance who attended the funeral were W. [illiam] J. [ay] Furlong, Jr., Rochelle, Ill., and W. [illiam] S. [imms] Timberlake and O. [tis] B.[rown] Timberlake of Alpha, Ill.
[Source: Bedford Times-Republican; Taylor County, Iowa; Thurs. 16 Dec 1915]

Obituary of William Simms Timberlake, son of Jemima (Simms) and Robert D. Timberlake:

W. S. Timberlake, 99, Dies In Illinois
Harry P. [ierce] Timberlake, Mrs. Nellie Sparks of Gravity, Mrs. T. [homas] E.[lliott] Anderson [Bertha], Mrs. Harold Fitch, Mrs. Verne Timberlake, Mrs. Claude Timberlake, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Stephens returned Wednesday from Alpha, Ill., where they attended the funeral services for their uncle, William Simms Timberlake on Tuesday afternoon.

Mr. Timberlake was a brother of the late R. [obert] D. [ouglas] Timberlake and Mrs. Susan Wainwright of this community and was the last member of a family of thirteen children, seven of whom lived to be more than eighty years of age. He was in his one hundredth year and had spent his long life in the same locality, residing the past few years on the same section on which he was born.

Possessed of a wonderful personality, Mr. Timberlake retained his cheerfulness and optimism and keen mind to the last. His death was caused by a fall, breaking a bone in his leg, and came peacefully at St. Mary's Hospital in Galesburg, Ill., on Sunday, Oct. 15.

He was a life-long member of the Masonic order and was one of the very last survivors of the 102 Illinois Company, which was of Civil War prominence. His grandfather, Joseph Timberlake served seven years in the Lifeguard of George Washington.

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. W. D. Lee of Goodhope, Ill., under the auspices of the Kewanee Post of the American Legion. Burial was in the Summit Level cemetery at Woodhull, Ill.

Mr. Timberlake is survived by one son, O. [tis] B. [rown] Timberlake. Also by six grandchildren and three great grandchildren. His wife was the former Miss Sarah Powell and was an aunt of the Powells of this community.
[Source: Bedford Times-Press; Taylor County, Iowa,Thursday  19 October 1939]

Death notice of George Washington Timberlake, son of Jemima (Simms) and Robert D. Timberlake:

Robert Timberlake received a message last Friday morning from Alpha, Ill., bringing the intelligence that his twin brother, Geo. [Washington] Timberlake had committed suicide on Friday evening at his home near Alpha; Further particulars of the sad affair have not been learned.
[Source: Bedford Free Press; Taylor County, Iowa; Thurs. 27 Feb 1896]